Federal Discrimination Laws Compared to California State Laws

You are here

 

 

Overview

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to discriminate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

Most employers with at least 15 employees are covered by EEOC laws (20 employees in age discrimination cases). Most labor unions and employment agencies are also covered.

The laws apply to all types of work situations, including hiring, firing, promotions, harassment, training, wages, and benefits.

Authority & Role

The EEOC has the authority to investigate charges of discrimination against employers who are covered by the law. In an investigation, the EEOC is to fairly and accurately assess the allegations in the charge and then make a finding. If the EEOC finds that discrimination has occurred, it will try to settle the charge. If it isn't successful, it has the authority to file a lawsuit to protect the rights of individuals and the interests of the public. The EEOC does not, however, file lawsuits in all cases where it finds discrimination.

The EEOC also works to prevent discrimination before it occurs through outreach, education and technical assistance programs.

The EEOC provides leadership and guidance to federal agencies on all aspects of the federal government's equal employment opportunity program. EEOC assures federal agency and department compliance with EEOC regulations, provides technical assistance to federal agencies concerning EEO complaint adjudication, monitors and evaluates federal agencies' affirmative employment programs, develops and distributes federal sector educational materials and conducts training for stakeholders, provides guidance and assistance to Administrative Judges who conduct hearings on EEO complaints, and adjudicates appeals from administrative decisions made by federal agencies on EEO complaints.

Location

The EEOC's headquarters are in Washington, D.C. and 53 field offices serve every part of the United States.

 

 
 

Call us at 408.797.0000

Call us at 408.797.0000

Call us for a consultation at 408.797.0000. We offer expert services and proven experience with complex issues that others can overlook.

Save this page

 

Who's Online

 
There are currently 0 users and 46 guests online.

visit us at:

  95 South Market St., Suite 363
    San José, CA 95113
 (408) 797-0000

  200 Washington St., Suite 208
    Santa Cruz, CA 95060
 (831) 245-0000

The Olender Pro Bono Project

We represent some clients who have compelling cases and little money at no charge. Sean received the Benito Juarez human rights award in 2008 and the ALRP Volunteer Award in 2012 for taking more than 10 pro bono cases in 12 months. We need volunteers. E-mail Debbie to volunteer.

NEWSLETTERS

Change Your Address at DHS!

If you are not a US citizen, you must change your address with DHS within 10 days of moving or face deportation. Click Here.